Interior Design Trends Expected to Take Hold in 2018


Get the lowdown on the colors, materials and other design decisions gaining steam now



1. Dedicated chopping and baking stations. 

Regular countertop height is fine for those casual weekly meals. But for larger, more involved recipes that require a lot of chopping, rolling or other strenuous maneuvers, a lower countertop is more ideal. That’s why some avid home cooks are gravitating toward dedicated chopping and baking stations that are often a continuation of a larger, standard-height island.


2. Matte black finishes. 

Last year, satin brass made its takeover of kitchens. This year, look out for matte black in bathrooms as well as kitchens. Homeowners looking for a statement-making look that’s contemporary and complements a variety of materials and styles are embracing this tough, versatile finish. Companies like Moen, whose matte black finish is shown here, are expanding their products to include more options in the durable finish.


3. More color in kitchens.

White will always be a classic palette for kitchens, as the annual Houzz kitchen trends study continues to show. But its increased popularity means there’s going to be some all-white-kitchen fatigue as homeowners look for ways to personalize their space. So while white kitchens aren’t even close to going away, expect to see a rise in color for the kitchen, especially other neutrals like gray and blue. Plus, warm wood tones are becoming a popular replacement for painted cabinets, leading to sophisticated, rich palettes.



4. Antibacterial materials. 

Imagine a countertop that helps take care of that salmonella bacteria for you after preparing chicken for dinner. That’s the idea behind several materials presented at the International Exhibition of Ceramic Tile and Bathroom Furnishings (CERSAIE) in Italy back in September.

The new K-Life technology incorporated into Porcelanosa’s Krion solid surface not only is antibacterial but also eliminates chemicals that come into contact with it, as well as purifies the surrounding air.

How does it accomplish this? Through a process called photocatalysis, which uses a semiconductor in the surface to enhance a reaction to light, killing bacteria and breaking up pollutants.


5. Dining tables in the kitchen. 

Not everyone is in favor of a big island, especially for eating family meals. Who wants to face the same direction all the time, as in a diner? Many homes, especially those with smaller kitchens, are reconsidering a traditional dining table in place of an island.


6. Wallpaper-like tile. 

Several fascinating tile styles captured the attention of visitors at CERSAIE. There’s new tile that looks like wood, concrete, resin, fabric and even wallpaper. The latter is prized for offering the elaborate pattern look of modern-day wallpapers while being durable enough to wipe down with a sponge and detergent.


7. Glass insert for tub-shower combos. 

Many still love their shower curtains, but partial glass dividers are coming on strong. Glass shower panels keep compact spaces airy and open, allowing a clear view to a statement shower tile or more natural light.


8. Concrete accents. 

Concrete has always been a popular material choice, but don’t be surprised to see it in more unexpected ways, such as in furniture, decorative accessories, wallcoverings, countertops and tile. My clients are expressing a desire to use materials in unusual ways,” says designer and Houzz Contributor Jennifer Ott. “Concrete is as popular as ever, but it’s showing up in unexpected places such as in furniture, decorative accessories and even as concrete-look wallcoverings.”

Designer Yanic Simard agrees. “The humble material and its comforting cool tones mixed with light linen and pearl grays add relaxed air to any space,” he says.

And the concrete look is carrying over into other materials as well. The stoneware tiles shown here (Beton Chic from Ricchetti’s Manifattura del Duca range) mimic the texture of concrete and come in a variety of colors.